Friday, 18 October 2013

The Garage (The Modelling Room)

As mentioned in a previous post I've been trying to spend time working on converting my garage into a comfortable modelling room. When I discussed my proposal with a builder friend he suggested that I consider using foam (SilverSill Foam) to glue the insulation to the walls and the same foam to glue plasterboard to the insulation. This seemed a very foreign method and, while I was installing extra roofing joists and wiring for new light and ring main, questions that kept running though my head were:
  1. What if, in the future, I wanting to hang shelves on the walls? 
  2. How strong would the bond be to the wall? 
  3. Would damp coming through the walls affect the adhesion of the foam?
  4. I was thinking of using 100mm thick insulation for the walls but, because of pillars in the garage, would like to have an air gap between the insulation and wall of about 40mm. Would using foam as glue have a negative affect on this air gap?
All these questions kept haunting me. Irrespective of the follow up conversations and a practical demonstration (in which the foam did glue plasterboard to a mucky piece of timber like 'shit to a blanket') I was never convinced that it was the correct method for me to use. In consulting a different builder friend, while he did not dismiss the method as being outlandish nor incorrect, he thought that a traditional method for lining the walls would be more suitable. So a 100mm x 47mm timber stud frame was discussed as the way forward. Now I can get my head around that...

Part of the garage is beneath ground level. Even though the garage does seem very dry, I've applied Tanking Slurry to these walls to stop water penetration.

Tanking Slurry applied

As I didn't know what I was buying nor how it needed to be applied I only purchased a 20kg bag, which covered about half the the wall area I needed to treat. The best way to describe the solution is as a cement slurry, mixed so that a 4" brush will stand upright in the bucket and applied as thick as possible to the walls. Easy peasy...another bag has been ordered...

First timber frame

While waiting for the extra bag of Tanking Slurry to arrive, I knocked together the first frame. This will have a damp course membrane between the floor and timber floor plate, as well as a vapour barrier stapled to the back between the outside wall and the frame. Installing 100mm Celotex insulation within the frame, should make it a warm, dry room...

3 comments:

David Smith said...

Stud frame, fibre glass insulation, and plasterboard is what I used. The room is cool in summer and warm in winter, unless temperature drops close to freezing when a heating appliance is needed. Floor is concrete and not insulated and this is where the coldness comes from in winter. Carpeting is not good enough. Hope that helps.

Yan said...

Thanks David
I've seen some interlocking rubber tile/mats that I'm considering using to cover the concrete floor. They're about 15mm thick and think targeted for use on Gym floors. Should be comfortable to walk on and keep my feet warmish. We will see though...

Bob said...

Sorry, late catching up as always !

I previously used the Maplin interlocking mats but then found these http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/24-SQ-FT-INTERLOCKING-FOAM-MATS-TILES-GYM-PLAY-GARAGE-WORKSHOP-FLOOR-MAT-BLACK-/400564800020?pt=UK_Sporting_Goods_Exercise_Fitness_Fitness_Accessories_ET&hash=item5d4385ca14

Sorry about the length of the link! The firm is in Northern Ireland but even with postage they were somewhat cheaper.